Prairie Barbie

Prairie momma, modern homesteader, blogger, advocate for rural living.  Making life as beautiful as possible.

Simple Sunday

Most Sundays, we get up and go to our simple, old fashioned Baptist church.  Singing old, faith filled hymns and filling our souls with the word of God.  It doesn't get much better than that.  But not today.  Today I need a break from being on the road.  Today I need a break from just about everything.  I need some time for the simple things that make life good.

So yes, I sat alone in my garden for a little while this morning and talked with God.  And then made a little mental list of things I need today.  For my soul.

I need to watch my banged up ol' dog find the perfect spot of cool shady grass to lay down in and then join him for a few minutes to pet his ears the way he likes me to. 

I need to pick some of the flowers growing in the yard and put them on the table to enjoy.

I need to move that little cucumber plant to a place where it gets more water so it can thrive instead of struggle.

I need to let the boys run through the sprinklers until they are soaked to the bone and happily dripping on the front porch.

I need to make something yummy in the kitchen.  All week we have just been getting by when it came to dinner.  It's time for something delicious....

I'm sure you catch the theme here today.  Simple.  The little moments are what fill the soul back up for the crazy week ahead.  Take some time today to find some of those moments.  Even just one of those moments.... Trust me, you need it.

 

Now go make something beautiful,

PB

I Can Still Ride

I'm thirty nine.  Life has thrown me more curve balls than I ever imagined it could.  But my life's passion has never changed.  Not for a moment.      I can still ride.  

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For thirty five of my years I have pushed myself, trained, strived, taught, lived and breathed it.  I can still ride. 

Even though my body has softened in places, stiffened in places and refused to let go of all the weight from carrying twin boys.  I can still ride.

 

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I must've spent a million hours in the saddle, working on my riding position, my balance and training techniques.  I stand pigeon toed from my ankles being trained to twist into stirrups and drop my heels.  The correct position may not come as easily as it once did. But I can still ride. 

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When the days get long and the bills pile up.  When there's so many balls in the air I feel like I will drop them all, I can still ride.  

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There's still a willing, equine partner waiting for me.  Together we can focus on the future.  On improving ourselves a little bit each time we saddle up. This pursuit changes us.  It requires strength and determination thru failure and fear. 

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There's been injuries of course.  The bad days happen to every horseman.  But it's taught me that things can be overcome and after the worst of days, I can still ride. 

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Life has many obligations, stresses, challenges and struggles.  Like trying to be the best mom I can be.  Like learning a new vocation to keep the money flowing.  Like trying to move forward when it feels like we're pretty bogged down.   

So more than anything I am grateful.  Grateful for my horses, my past coaches, my kids allowing me to steal moments for myself here and there, my Michael who understands and shares my passion and for the ability.  To ride.  Still. 

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Now go make something beautiful,  

PB

Today On The Farm

It's one of those lovely s l o w summer days.... The boys and I have been doing outdoor chores. 

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Like shoveling manure.  

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A little hoeing, weeding and watering. There are some plants in there, I swear. We can see them once we yank out all those thistles. 

 

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While we have been working the chickens are over in their pasture, chasing bugs in the tall grass.... 

 

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The cat named Sherbert found a shady spot to watch the action.  

 

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The mare named Kitty mowed some weeds for us....  

 

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and now that the work is done we'll have a cool drink and maybe a nap on the couch before we head out to the creek with a fishin' pole.  

Now go make something beautiful,  

PB

Wilderness Barbie

I'm not exactly a fit goddess. I am active, I ride horses often, I like hiking and being outdoors but I am just a work in progress.  But I want you to know you can be a little like me and still get out there!  Get outdoors and explore some wild places, far off places and the beauty God gave us.  

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My boys love being in the woods because most of the time we are out on the prairie.  The prairie has its beauty too, but the woods feel magical to us.  I'm thankful the wilderness, The Bob Marshall Wilderness to be exact, is a relatively short drive away.  

It is Grizzly (and lion and wolf) country. Be prepared.  

It is Grizzly (and lion and wolf) country. Be prepared.  

Some of the magic is in the amazing plants that share the mountain side. 

Bear grass

Bear grass

Lady slipper

Lady slipper

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He looks so grown up, I could cry!  

He looks so grown up, I could cry!  

Lunch time.  

Lunch time.  

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We ate lunch in the saddle between these two waterfalls.  Yup, way over there. 

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This is as far as the little boys and I went. The hike over the falls was more than they (or I) could handle safely.  I have a serious heights phobia and become a danger to myself and others if I'm not careful. Ha!  

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Michael and his son went all the way to the top and took pictures for momma.  

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This is pretty much the top of the Rockies. It amazing and should be on your bucket list. Sometimes we can feel like this world doesn't have anything wild and free left in it.  But let me tell you, it does!  Get out and find it! 

Now go make something beautiful, 

PB

Thank You Mr. Salatin

Everybody needs a hero.  Ever since I watched the film, "Food Inc.", Joel Salatin has been mine.  This man exudes passion and authenticity.  I LOVE authenticity.  So four years ago I read all of his books on sustainable farming.  "You Can Farm" is my favorite.  If you are a farm nerd like me, read it!  From Joel I learned about grass based farming, pasturing my chickens and more than I can explain in a little blog post.

Four years ago, I used to say to my mom,  "Geez I wish Joel would come to Montana!  But I know he never will.... sighhhh."  But wouldn't ya know!  Last week I got a message from one of my besties that Joel was doing a conference in Montana!  Only two hours from me!  I could have pinched myself!   

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Yesterday I got up early and headed east to another tiny farm town called Winnett.  Winnett is as much in the middle of nowhere as Geraldine.  Why he ended up there I still don't know.  But around 300 other farm nerds filled the high school gym to hear what Mr. Salatin had to say.  A lovely, older farm wife leaned over to me and said she was pretty sure half the population of Petroleum County was in that gym!  We sat there from 9:30 to about 4:00 and listened to a brilliant man offering new ideas on farming and ranching. 

I took a short video when he was discussing direct marketing and customer relationships. Pardon the big guy blocking the view. I was trying to record without being obnoxious so I didn't move from my seat. 

He also spoke also of family, raising our children to love the farm and so many more things.  Here are some quotes from the day....

"When you are a hundred miles from a Coke machine, marketing gets difficult!"

"Lead by example.  Be the lunatic fringe."

"It's not about having something that somebody else has."

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Lately I have scaled back my little farm operation.  I had been feeling a little defeated in some ways.  "People around here don't get it.", I was saying to myself.  And they don't.  But that's ok.  I now feel refreshed to carry on with the path that God has call me to.  Raising good kids and raising good food....

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Anybody wanna buy some grass fed beef?  *wink

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Thank you Mr. Salatin.  You showed up in Montana just in time to inspire a prairie momma to keep on farming!

 

Now go make something beautiful,

PB

Down A Dirt Road

On the way to town, a ways down the gravel road, is an old abandoned farmhouse. 

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Long ago a farm wife must've planted a flower garden in front of her little house. It had poppies and a lilac hedge.  

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Both are still thriving. There in the middle of an overgrown prairie is a spot of brightness and beauty.  

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My sons and I pulled off the road and picked a few for our table.  From one antique farm to another.... 

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I feel that the lady who loved that little farmhouse would've been glad to share them. And I get to share them with you.... 

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Now go make something beautiful,  

PB

Around the Farm

Sometimes the words don't flow.... life can have a way of silencing the writing.  But when it does, the need for beautiful things can be even greater.  This morning around this farm there are many beautiful things.  Here are some things I am grateful for....

Every year I put pansies in this bucket.  Every year I love them!

The wild blue phlox has decided to decorate the front of the henhouse this year.  I think it looks kinda patriotic!

Apparently, Roxie is pretty sure the grass is greener on the other side of the fence.  I am thankful for all the rain we've had that gave us all this grass for the critters to eat.

 

Now go make something beautiful,

PB

Bathroom Renovation Revealed!

Welcome to the little, old, prairie farmhouse.  This house was built in 1941 and I have strong suspicions it was actually a Sears kit home.  It has a lot of the features and the floor plan that those kit homes had.  During the height of WWII materials were even more scare out here on the northern prairie and quite a few kit homes were brought in on the train and assembled on farmsteads.

Wayyyyy back at the beginning of April we started a project that was supposed to last a week or so.  My sweetheart's lovely momma and her main squeeze were kind enough to fly up here from Saint Louis to help us tear apart and remodel the farmhouse bathroom.  And boy, did it need it!  It was by far the ugliest, nastiest room in the house.  Have a look, if you dare....

The wall boards were rotten and crumbling.  There was mold.  There was mineral deposits, there shower walls were sort of "cut to fit" the uneven walls.  The cabinet was original to the house and so large that you hit your knees when sitting on the toilet.  No joke! 

The light fixture was broken and had been wired in a "Jerry rigged" fashion.  It was flat out scary and I was pretty sure it would someday burn the house down.  Having the toilet across from the sink made it so you had to walk around or step over the toilet to get to the shower.  There pretty much wasn't enough room for me to stand there and help my little boys brush their teeth. 

I'm so glad I took these photos to go back and reminisce!  Walls were ripped out to be straightened.  The tub was never gonna fit in between the crooked walls. The plumbing was moved across the room for the toilet and the tub drain.  Wiring was all redone with actual safe outlets and a properly wired light fixture. A new floor was put in to level that up as well. The process was so amazingly dusty, dirty, long, frustrating and almost unbearable.  After ten solid days we still weren't done.

This is my honey putting up tile after a long day of work.  We also did tile on weekends. For like ever..... and ever.  If I never tile another shower it will be too soon.  Not Mike's favorite thing either.  But after it was all said and done, it WAS worth it!

Two months after we started I can finally say it's done.  Well there is this little bit of paint touch up to do.... and maybe..... But we'll say it's done.

Ta-da!!  Isn't it lovely?!

These two lovely rooms were on Pinterest and we used them both for a little inspiration.  I don't claim to be a bonafide designer, so finding rooms we liked and then making our own version was our design process.

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I hope you like our little farmhouse bathroom!  I feel like it came out even better than we hoped for.  I hope this inspires you to tackle that project in your own house that you know you want to do!  It really is worth the hassle.  Every day this old farmhouse feels a little less like a project house and more like a home.

 

Now go make something beautiful,

PB

 

Technical Info:

Tub, sink, toilet, light fixture, tile and flooring all from Home Depot.  (It's all we have available and even that is 70 miles away.)

Paint colors:

Beadboard-  Behr "White"

Upper Walls- Valspar "Skyfall"

Shower curtain-  Threshold for Target

Barn photo- Taken by Yours Truly

Other décor-  Items I had laying around the house.

Prepared

Last night, a nice little spring storm brought us heavy, wet snow and high winds.  I knew the snow was predicted and did a few things to "batten down the hatches" yesterday afternoon.  Filled the horse water tanks to the brim. Fed the critters all a little extra and brought in enough firewood to last a day or so. The pantry was pretty well stocked so we're good right?

One of the reasons that many of us are modern homesteaders is to be prepared for those times that modern conveniences might be scarce. We learn to raise and process our own meat animals. We keep chickens so eggs are plentiful.  Gardens are grown, seeds are gathered for next year etc. Candles and kerosene lamps are always well stocked and the gun cabinet is too.

 

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The power pole snapped sometime around 2:00 a.m.  We got up and stoked the fire and kept it burning during the night. So the house wasn't an ice box this morning.  Last summer I insisted on installing that little wood stove in the old farmhouse for back up heat.  Today, as the winds howl and the snow piles up, I am so glad to have it! 

All in all we sound pretty prepared right?  I'm giving us a "D" on our little "test". Here's why.  

1.  I didn't bring in nearly enough wood or put enough under cover to keep it dry. 

2. The only drinking water I have on hand is a few bottles left by Michael's momma when she visited last week.   We don't often buy bottled water and it was a fluke that we had it.  

3. We do have a generator we can hook up to the water pump when we need to. Or to plug in the freezer if it started thaw.  But it doesn't have any gas at the moment and we don't have any on hand!   Doh!!

4. We can cook on the grill in the back yard once it stops snowing and blowing.  But the propane levels are low too. Geez! 

We are rugged Montanans! We are supposed to be more prepared. What the heck?!  

 

 

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Next time we have one of these tests, we will get an "A"!  How about you?  If the power went out right this minute, how well would you manage?  For Pete's sake, have enough drinking water on hand!  I still can't believe we didn't do that.   At least we do have enough food that doesn't have to be cooked and plenty of food for our menagerie of critters to last well beyond the storm.  Michael will bring more drinking water home from his work in another town and I have lots of wood drying out in the house.  

But I hope y'all learn from my mistakes and make sure you are more prepared than we were for this storm and power outage.  It only takes a few things to help us sail through the rainy (or snowy) days.

 

Now go make something beautiful, 

PB

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Easter Geese

What did y'all do for Easter?  I hope there was a time of connection and reflection for everyone.  Easter was a little different for us this year.  We found ourselves kind of scattered to the wind.  That meant there was an opportunity for me to spend some momma time with just my boys. 

My boys love science and nature.  Even the little guys tell me they are scientists.  Which I think is pretty neat.  I want them to be thinkers!  We are blessed to be in Montana where nature surrounds us and people do not! (Haha.)  Anyway, there is a little, non-descript lake near us.  It sits at the base of the Rockies on the east slope.  It's a windswept, barren looking place.  And twice a year, magic happens there.

Twice a year, white geese and swans migrate through Freezout Lake from their winter grounds in the central valley of California to their summer grounds in the Alaskan arctic in the spring and follow the opposite route in the fall.  The spring migration typically peaks during the last week of March, with anywhere from 150,000 to 200,000 snow geese and 6,000 to 7,000 swans.

So while I am far from an actual, wildlife expert or photographer, the boys and I trekked out to the edge of the lake to witness the event for ourselves.

The noise was surprising.  Very loud and constant chatter.  I'm sure they have a lot to talk about.  They have a long trip to plan!

Here's some info I Googled about these special visitors.  You know, because my kids got their geek habits from their momma.

Quick Facts about Snow Geese

  • Weight: 6 lbs (male) 5.5 lbs (female)
  • Average speed: 50 miles per hour
  • Migration Distance: 3,000 miles at 2,952-ft altitude
  • Wing Span: 35 inches
  • Voice: A high-pitched, barking "bow-wow!" or "howk-howk!"
  • Color: Two color phases: in the "blue" phase, the head and upper neck are pure white, with grayish-brown to black body and in the "snow" phase they are all white with black wing tips
  • Diet: shoots and roots, grass, bulbs, insects, berries, grains, aquatic plants and invertebrates

The boys also got to spend time examining the bones of fish and birds with some nice folks from the Montana Naturalist group from Missoula. We just happened to bump into them and they gave my boys some neat things for their collection. 

Anyhow, that's how we spent Easter here in Montana.  I wish you all a blessed week.

Now go make something beautiful,

PB

Beautiful Morning

Early morning can seem pretty magical on our little place.  It's like the whole world is having a yawn and a stretch before taking on the day.  Of course the rooster crowing is pretty much the icing on the cake. 

So, just in case it's been a while since you got to have a peaceful morning, I made this little video for y'all. ... 

Be sure to turn your volume all the way up for the effect. Otherwise it's just a photo of the sunrise. ;) 

 

Now go make something beautiful, 

PB

Horse Sale Life

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There's a sub-culture you might have never known about.  Horse sales.   Last weekend my main squeeze and I attended a big, special horse sale down in Billings. Not the average, once a month sale where many horses are sold, quick. This sale offered eight hundred horses. Most were sons and daughters of renowned horses. Most were very high dollar too!  But all I could think about as we walked around the complex was, "What a tough way to make a living!"

Eight hundred horses were hauled from just about every western state and provinces of Canada. They were bathed, brushed, prepped and stalled on Thursday night. People and horses rushed about in crowded alleyways. The folks selling the horses had to be present near the pens and stalls to answer questions of potential buyers. For hours and hours. After driving a thousand miles, caring for the horses, doing all the paperwork, making attractive sale flyers to hang on the gates.... 

The next day the same folks saddled up the horses to be previewed. Wannabe buyers watched as each horse was shown off for the crowd. Some roped calves, some ran barrels, some just loped circles. The buyers wanted to see how they handled. 

Friday night a hundred head went through the ring. Most didn't bring as much as the seller hoped. They weare unlucky to draw a sale time before the big buyers arrived on Saturday. 

The next morning at seven we saved our seats in the top row. Sale time was at noon and If we didn't get there that early there would be no seats. We piled our things on a seat and went to the cafe down in the front of the sale barn. The place was packed. The waitresses were rushed, but the food was good. Like one of those run down truck stops that serves home style meals. 

Every person within ear shot was talking horses. Which ones were outstanding, which ones were lame, which ones they hoped to take home.  Several hundred people with the same goal. Buy the best horse for the lowest bid possible. Or sell the horses for as much as possible to keep the grocery bills paid.  

Horse sales are a family affair. The kids of the business amaze me. Cute little girls are recruited to ride the steeds through the ring. They're taught that being cute sells. They're out there riding them ponies until late at night. It's cold, dark, wind blowing and those kids are getting it done without complaining. I told one little girl that she's definitely tougher than I am. I wanted to be back in my hotel room with a cup of tea.   

Saturday night after hours in our chairs, a little bay mare came through the ring and no one was very interested in her. She wasn't as fancy as most of the others. The mares we had hoped to buy went too high for our budget. So we still had our money in our pockets. Michael looked at me sheepishly, we agreed and bought her on a whim.  Impulse shopping at a horse sale is usually a bad idea! But the little mare came home with us and she is a sweetheart. Thank goodness!  

After being at the sale for thirteen hours, we loaded her up and drove five hours to home. The most tired I've ever been in my life is at the end of horse sales. I told Michael we sure can't do this very often. 

It's a tough way to make a living. 

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Now go make something beautiful,  

PB

The Heart of Winter

My sweetheart had never seen or heard of "freezing fog" until he moved to Montana.  After he said that today, I thought about that.  I have lived all over these United States. The only place I've seen the the countryside engulfed in fog while it's also sub-zero temperatures, is Montana. 

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This can be a harsh place. The hardy souls that settled this land had to be the toughest kind. Michael and I have had a few theological discussions about whether or not there is purgatory, somewhere up there, near heaven.  I was pretty sure we settled that debate after some study a while back. But today as we drove through 100 miles of freezing fog, he said, "You know what?  There is a purgatory.  It's Montana in the heart of winter."

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Now go make something beautiful, 

PB

The List

At the end of last summer we wrote up this "To Do" list for the old homestead.  Old farmhouses and adorable, but ancient farm buildings can literally mean unending projects. Today, I looked at the list on the fridge and crossed a few things off of it. Then I took a moment to enjoy the fact that we only have TWO little projects left on the list!!! That feels like a victory!  Of course, after we finish the list we will just write another.... but oh well.  It's good to see the progress on paper! 

The new year is usually a time we feel the urge to write some new lists.  Resolutions, aspirations and the like.  This new year I admit I am finding it more difficult than usual to feel inspired.  Maybe this northern life, with it's lack of daylight, has depleted my vitamin D levels or something.... So today's realization that a lot really has been accomplished on the farm was just what I needed.  

My mom has always made "to do" lists.  They used to frighten me horribly!  Hers were always much too long and difficult for my younger self. Now I make the lists.... and they are long and difficult!  But I see the reward of having a list with all those lines drawn through it. 

If you are feeling a bit like me, a little overwhelmed this new year of 2016, I suggest it's time for a list!  Make one that you know you will be able to cross some things off of fairly soon.  We can't afford to lose our mojo, now can we? 

My oldest son decided it was his job to tame the barn cats. 

My oldest son decided it was his job to tame the barn cats. 

Mission accomplished!

Mission accomplished!

Now go make something beautiful,

PB

A Touchy Subject

Lately, I have noticed a movement of sorts regarding  rehoming pets.  It seems that many people feel that if you have to rehome a pet for any reason, that is an irresponsible and terrible thing.  Having a recent experience with this myself, it has got me asking the question, "When is it a good thing to rehome a pet or farm animal?"  I believe almost everyone who has had pets and animals in their lives, has had to rehome a critter at some point.  Of course there are people out there that seem to think pets are accessories, to be changed with the seasons.  I'm not talking about that.  That is irresponsible and not good stewardship. But what if?

  1. You adopted a puppy.  The puppy is a cute, feisty, strong willed puppy that you enjoy having in your lives.  Until.... that pup shows some aggressive behavior as a juvenile.  Obedience training is effective for the basics but the pup begins growling and snapping at you on occasion.  She grows up and obviously knows she's the alpha in your home.  Your efforts to maintain your status as master are ineffective and it is aggressive and violent to your other pets.  Maybe attacking your old, senior dog at meal time and causing the whole house a lot of stress.  Then one day your child toddles over to the dog while it has it's favorite bone and WHAM!  Your child is a dog bite victim with a scar on his face for the rest of his life. 

In my opinion, anyone who keeps a dog like that in a home with their children is putting a dog above their children's safety.  To be frank.... that's dead wrong.  That dog needs to be removed from the home, whatever the cost or circumstance.

2.  Your husband is promoted and you find out you are required to move across the country. Temporary employee housing doesn't allow pets of any kind.  In order for your family to have a better economic situation, you will have to rehome the kitty you adopted at the shelter last year.  Should you be labeled irresponsible?  I sure don't think so.  So finding a new, loving home is truly the best option.

3.  You bought your daughter a horse when she was twelve.  The horse was a dream come true for her and saw her through the turmoil of teenage life.  But she went to college across the state and now never has time to ride when she's home on break.  The poor ol' horse sits alone in the pasture day after day.  Shouldn't he have a chance to go be loved by a new little girl who worships the ground he canters on?  I sure think so....

So you see.... just because someone has to rehome a pet, does not instantly mean they are not doing the right thing.  It makes me sad to see people being chastised for trying to do what's best for their families and their animals.  Don't judge someone until you are in their "paws".

Here's my story with Daphne.  Several months ago, after we lost our beloved Boston Terrier that we'd had for almost 9 years, we adopted a cute little mutt.   She needed a home and was going to be a small-ish sized dog that might be a great house dog.  She was a little black fluff ball and cute as a bug.  But.... Daphne was very high energy and Daphne really wanted to be outside with the big dogs.  However, the big dogs hated her!  There was a lot of growling and it worried me.  Daphne's energetic personality meant she didn't want to lounge around and be loved on in the house and she was truly unhappy being cooped up.  To let us know how unhappy she was, she refused to be housebroken.  She was stressed and so were we. 

So when a young college aged couple needed a companion pup for their also, very high energy mini Aussie, Daphne found her perfect match in humans.  Daphne got two energetic young people to spoil her and a new best friend to play with every day.  Was it wrong for us to let her go to a home where she has a lifestyle that suits her better and she is truly adored for being her rambunctious self?  I sure don't think so. 

Now, a couple months passed and fate brought us "Joy".  Another Boston Terrier angel.  Joy is so much like Gwynne was.  Playful, but happy to lounge on the sofa.  She loves being right with us and never complains about being our house doggie.  Her personality totally fits our family and she and us are all completely over-joyed.  She has found her people and we hope to have her forever.  Things worked out, just as they should.

Now go make something beautiful,

PB


Protection for Protection

As a few of you know, we have two livestock guardian dogs.  And one ol' hound dog that thinks he's a guard dog.  Our LGD's are half Turkish Kangal and half Maremma.  A totally perfect cross in my opinion. Our dogs are the biggest, cuddliest, love bugs when it comes to me and the kids.  If Judge could be a lap dog, he would be.

But when it comes to coyotes and other predators, it's a different story.  They are fierce guardians.  One hundred and thirty pounds of muscle and hate.  They are fearless and devoted defenders against anything they feel is a threat to the safety of our animals and our family.   I love my dogs, can you tell?

Lately the predator threat around our place has increased.  The dogs have been coming home from their patrols with some injuries.  Nothing serious thank goodness.  But some lacerations on their muzzles, a bite mark here and there and poor ol' Deuce the hound lost part of an ear. 

We needed to do something to protect our protection.  In Turkey, where the Kangal breed was developed, it is common to provide the dogs with wide, spiked collars to guard their neck area.  The jugular vein is vulnerable so the collars are very helpful against that kind of attack.

Now we needed to find a Turkish style collar for our crew.  Not an easy task.  You cannot simply buy them at Petco and the like.  "Hi, I need a wide collar with three inch spikes please."  Might get you funny looks at the pet shop.

So I put out an "in search of" post on a Livestock Guardian Dog web page and was directed to a blacksmith that happens to live about an hour from me.  He makes amazing collars in the Turkish style but out of nylon web. I gave him a call. 

He was quick to interrogate me.  "What kind of dogs do you have?"  "How many?"  "Where do you live?"  What predators do you have?"  At first I was taken back by the stranger asking me so many questions but then he explained.  He never advertises that he makes the collars.  The collars are his little secret because he absolutely will not make them for people who have dogs that are not livestock guardians.  He fears people with fighting dogs, such as pit bulls, will try to get his collars.  So it's our little secret.  But I am so thankful for him and his hard to get collars.   

Tonight when the coyotes or wolves howl, I won't have to worry so much.  The dogs actually seem to like the collars.  Judge put his on and went right back to his very important nap on the front lawn.  Jury is looking forward to her patrol tonight and Deuce is trying to figure out if we can make him a spiked helmet to protect his ears....

Have a great evening y'all.

 

Now go make something beautiful,

PB

 

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